As I said in the blog I posted for yesterday I am changing the subject of my yearly project. As much as I love owls I love this new subject even more and no it isn’t pictures of my grandkids and all their wonderfully glorious, sometimes annoying things they do. Just a quick pic so you can see how adorable they are. I love being a grandma.     22894300_949502261869069_2233122799084110755_n.jpg

My new subject is a hobby I took up towards the beginning of 2017. It doesn’t demand perfection, staying within the lines or trying to draw something that will never look on paper like it does in real life. I will be doing a zentangle a day going forward.

I hear you ‘What is zentangle?’

What Is It?

The Zentangle Method is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured patterns. We call these patterns, tangles. You create tangles with combinations of dots, lines, simple curves, S-curves and orbs. These simple shapes are the “Elemental Strokes” in all Zentangle art. These patterns are drawn on small pieces of paper called “tiles.” We call them tiles because you can assemble them into mosaics.

Zentangle art is non-representational and unplanned so you can focus on each stroke and not worry about the result. There is no up or down to Zentangle art. If fact, you can most easily create Zentangle art by rotating your tile as you tangle — always keeping your hand in a relaxed position. You don’t need to know what a tangle is going to look like to draw it. You just need to know the steps. The result is a delightful surprise.

We believe that life is an art form and that each person is an artist. The Zentangle Method is an elegant metaphor and model for inspiring a deliberate artistry in life.

For this reason, we deliberately do not include an eraser in our Zentangle Kit or use it as part of a Zentangle practice. We have no eraser in life, so why in a Zentangle Kit? There’s little use for it when you think about it. Pencil strings and borders can be ignored and pen marks can’t be erased. Even if those pen marks aren’t initially what you might have intended (we never call them “mistakes” in the Zentangle Method), you can use them as inspirations to go in directions that you may not have otherwise explored. Instead of looking at them as mistakes, we reframe them as “opportunities.”

By avoiding common blocks to creative flow such as: self-criticism, fear of failure, lack of immediate positive feedback, worrying about outcomes, frustration with lengthy training, lack of inspiration and doubts about what to do next, you can create beautiful art right away.

The Zentangle Method’s “elegance of limits” paradoxically inspires creativity with its gentle boundaries and structured patterns. These so-called limits enhance creativity and support a greater freedom of expression.

Through the Zentangle Method of drawing, you can

  • Relax
  • Focus
  • Expand your imagination
  • Trust your creativity
  • Increase your awareness
  • Respond confidently to the unexpected
  • Discover the fun and healing in creative expression
  • Enter a vibrant and supportive world-wide community
  • Feel gratitude and appreciation for this beautiful world and all that you can do
  • And perhaps most importantly . . . Have fun!

How does all that happen?

One reason is almost every person discovers they can create something unexpected and beautiful in about 15 minutes or so. That feels good, particularly for people who believed they couldn’t draw.

Another reason is it enables you to deliberately access a state of relaxed focus, wake up your imagination and express it creatively with confidence.

The Eight Steps of the Zentangle Method

Step 01 – Gratitude and Appreciation

Get comfortable, take a few deep breaths and feel gratitude and appreciation – for this beautiful paper, for these wonderful tools, for this opportunity to create something beautiful.

Step 02 – Corner Dots

We teach beginning Zentangle Method with beautiful museum grade cotton paper, 3.5 inches (89 mm) square. To answer a familiar question of what to put on this beautiful paper, place a light pencil dot in each corner, about a pen’s width from the edges. Now it’s no longer a blank piece of paper.

Step 03 – Border

Connect those dots with a light pencil line, straight or curvy, to create a square. This is your border.

Step 04 – String

Inside the border, draw a light pencil line or lines to make what we call a “string.” The string separates your tile into sections, in which you draw your tangles. A string can be any shape. It may be a curvy line that touches the edge of the border now and then, or series of straight lines that go from one side of the border to the next.

Step 05 – Tangle

A tangle is a predefined sequence of simple strokes that make up a pattern. Draw your tangles in pen inside (usually) the pencil strings and borders. Tangle is both noun and verb. Just as you dance a dance, you tangle your tangles. Draw your tangles with deliberate strokes. Don’t worry about what it’s going to look like. Just focus on each stroke of the pen as you make it. Trust that you’ll know what to do next when the time to do it comes. There is no up or down to Zentangle art so feel free to rotate your tile in any direction that is most comfortable for your hand as you draw.

Step 06 – Shade

Add shades of gray with a graphite pencil to bring contrast and dimension to your tile. The black and white two-dimensional tangles transform through shading and appear three-dimensional. You can also use a tortillion (a paper blending stump) to soften and blend the graphite.

Step 07 – Initial and Sign

This is art you created. You should sign it. Put your initials on the front (many people create a unique monogram or chop for this step). On the back, place your name, date, comments and observations.

Step 08 – Appreciate

Hold your tile at arm’s length. Turn it this way and that. Appreciate what you just created.

Examples of some of the designs you can use in your design

maxresdefault.jpg

 

My design and construction

20180105_195509

 

See you tomorrow and remember. Perfection is not required. Thanks zentangle.com for the information provided above.