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No More Silence

I hope for a better world for the generations to come and peace for the ones living through life now.

tea&bannock

I remember it vividly. Social class, 2007. Our teacher, Mr. P., was always great at starting class conversations and he was teaching us about World War II, and The Holocaust. I remember thinking about how ridiculous it was that the Nazi’s were able to “get so far” with their hate and that so many people died. It was unfathomable. It still is. I remember thinking to myself that people should have “done something sooner”. “Why didn’t people speak out against it?“. “I would.” Of course, people were. Good people. I also remember the message that we learned at an even younger age, “why do we have to learn about history?” “So we can learn from it.

I was young, naive, and foolish. I found it inconceivable that something like that could touch us here in this day and age in Canada. I knew there…

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It is a sad day when a little piece of your world dies because reality decided you needed to know something you really didn’t want to know. Long live Jim Croce, Elvis, John Denver and all the rest who were taken when we still needed them to keep our world soft and warm.

layce gardner

Yesterday, Saxon and I were listening to a Jim Croce album. Yep, you heard that right. An album. A vinyl album.

Anyway, Saxon looked at me and said, “Why did rock stars and musicians stop dying in airplane crashes?”

“What d’ya mean?” I asked.

“You know, musicians used to die in plane crashes a lot. Lynyrd Skynyrd, Buddy Holly, Otis Redding, Patsy Cline, Jim Croce, Ricky Nelson—

“Wait! Back up. What? Jim Croce?”

“Yeah, he died in a plane crash. He was maybe 30,” Saxon said.

I buried my face in my hands. I began to weep. Openly weep.

“You okay?” Saxon asked.

I shook my head and sobbed. “No, I am not okay. I didn’t know Jim Croce was dead.”

Saxon said, “He died like forty years ago. You’re crying now?”

“I didn’t know he was dead!” I blubbered. “To me, it’s like it just happened!”

I continued to…

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hecatedemeter

Rosie

As we go into this last weekend of summer, it’s a great time to gather friends and family for parties and cookouts – and this weekend I’ll be doing some of both – but it’s ALSO a great time to remember what we’re celebrating with our Labor Day holiday: honoring labor and trade organizations, and having a party for workers and their families.

Not consumers, workers.

We are more than consumers – we’re citizens and workers. This day is for us!

The next time you enjoy things like:

  • An 8-hour workday
  • Paid overtime
  • A weekend

Or think about the fact that your seven year old is not expected (or allowed) to get a job, that we do have a minimum wage (although it desperately needs to be raised), or that if you get injured on the job, you’re owed compensation, remember: that’s all thanks to labor unions.

And did…

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hecatedemeter

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I’m a child of the American South.  I’m the Witch of this Southern place, this place , this one here in Virginia, close-by the shores of Spout Run and the Potomac River.  I’m a woman whose spiritual life consists mainly of being in relationship with my Southern landbase.  And there’s a lot about the South that makes me proud.

I’m proud of our cooking, a melange, as Michael Twitty notes, of African, European, Island, and Native traditions.  Chef Twitty has called our cuisine a family affair and sometimes one full of family fights.  Give me ham biscuits, a mint julep, Old Bay, crawfish étouffée, fried catfish, my Aunt May’s hushpuppies, guava jelly, and a chess pie.

I’m proud of Southern writing, a genre not afraid to explore the shadows and the weird and to claim them, to claim them fully.

I’m proud of Southern gardens, Southern architecture, and Southern music…

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hecatedemeter

ADAPT

This is what courage looks like.

ADAPT members (including activist and badass Anita Cameron pictured above) sitting in – and getting arrested at – Senator Mitch McConnell’s (R-KY) Capitol Hill office, protesting Republicans’ efforts to “strip disabled people of lives and liberty…

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This is what courage looks like.

ADAPT members being arrested while staging a 58-hour sit-in in Senator Cory Gardner’s (R-CO) state office to protect the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid.

Collins

This is what courage looks like.

None of us will ever know what kind of pressure McConnell put on her behind the scenes, but Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) was an unwavering no on the Republicans’ efforts to dismantle access to health care for 20+ million Americans from the start.

Murkowski

This is what courage looks like.

Even after so-called President Trump threatened HER ENTIRE STATE, Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) held firm. She knew that the AHCA…

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fish camp

tea&bannock

From the moment I jumped into the boat to head my Jijuu’s fish camp, I could literally feel my mind ease and my body begin to let go of tension and stress. I can honestly say that our fish camp is my happiest place on Earth. It is where I can think my straightest and find my balance all while learning about my Gwich’in heritage and spending time with my Jijuu.

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While at fish camp, there is always work to be done. The nets have to be checked all day long, the fish need to be scaled, gutted, cleaned and cut to be dried, we need to gather the right type of wood to be burned for the fish to dry properly, fetch water from the creek, cook meals, keep the place clean and we always end our nights with a game of soccer. Some would say that the best…

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layce gardner

Saxon and I recently went back in the closet. Wait, it’s not what you think! We have never been in the closet in that way. I meant that we are literally in our closet.

Why are we in our closet? Because it’s our new sound studio. Our publishing company, Square Pegs Ink, has branched out to audiobooks! (pause for applause)

After months of study, Saxon and I bought everything we needed to produce our own audiobooks. From the mike to the shockmount to the mastering program… All that moolah adds up. We didn’t have enough of a budget left over to construct a soundproof studio space. So, we made do with the next best thing: our closet. (And actually, the sound we get from our closet is as good as, if not better, than an expensive studio.)

To be fair, the closet is a really nice one. It’s a walk-in…

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saxon bennett

It was Emma’s birthday and we were going to Big Splash Water Park, out to dinner, and cake with her grandparents. It was a big, big day. And we were packing. Em had to pack for the water park and dinner and then for pirate bonding on the river for the weekend and then for camp. She had lists for each bag and what needed to go in it. I think she may have gotten that from me and perhaps the importance of always having first aid kit. But I was keeping my mouth shut on those two accounts. It could just have been a coincidence.

I only had to pack for Big Splash and dinner and I was stressed. I had to pack my swimming suit and accoutrements and clothes for the restaurant afterwards. I stood arms akimbo in the living room, deep in thought. I looked over at…

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We Fight On ALL Fronts

hecatedemeter

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This past week, so-called President Trump, who’s been in seclusion since coming back from the G-20 meeting (probably more appropriately called the G-19 now), mainlining Fox & Friends and venting his spleen on Twitter, gave his first non-Fox News interview since his disastrous NBC interview with Lester Holt (in which he admitted on camera to intentionally obstructing justice in the firing of former FBI director James Comey) with Christian Broadcasting Network’s resident loon, Pat Robertson.

Yes, the same Pat Robertson who blamed the Pulse mass shooting, Hurricane Katrina, and September 11 on “teh gay.” The same Pat Robertson who claims feminism “encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism and become lesbians.” The same Pat Robertson who blamed Israeli PM Ariel Sharon’s stroke on the UN. The same Pat Robertson who advised nuking the State Department (yes, using a nuclear weapon on ourselves in our…

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hecatedemeter

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I’m looking forward to reading two books in the next few weeks, starting with Theodora Goss’s The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter.  The plot is delicious.  As NPR explains:

Mary Jekyll has never been more alone. Her father, Dr. Henry Jekyll, died 14 years ago, and her mother Ernestine has just passed away after going mad. Living in London in the 1890s, she’s subject to the era’s discrimination against women, which she confronts while trying to get her family’s affairs in order. She soon realizes she’s destitute — but her mother has left her clues to a bank account that lead to a girl named Diana Hyde.

Mary remembers Diana’s father from her childhood; Edward Hyde, crude and misshapen, was a friend of Dr. Jekyll’s. As a mystery coalesces around them — one that transcends their curious overlapping pasts — three other women enter their orbit, each of…

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